Premenopause, Perimenopause, and Menopause

Menopause, perimenopause, and post-menopause are different stages in a woman's life when her monthly period stops. This is the end of a woman's reproductive years. Peri-menopause is the first stage in this process and can start eight to 10 years before menopause. Menopause is the point when a woman no longer has menstrual periods for at least 12 months. Post-menopause is the stage after menopause.

 

What is Menopause?

There comes a time in a woman’s life when she stops having monthly periods,  It is a normal part of aging, and usually starts around the late 40s to the early 50s. Abnormally, however, some women undergo ovarian surgeries for various reasons and are compelled to experience what is called “sudden” surgical menopause. 

Why does menopause happen? 

As you age, the reproductive cycle begins to slow down and prepares to stop. This cycle has been continuously functioning since puberty. As menopause nears, the ovaries make less of a hormone called estrogen. When this decrease occurs, the menstrual cycle (period) starts to change. Monthly periods can become irregular and then stop. Physical changes can also happen as the body adapts to different levels of hormones. The symptoms experienced during each stage of menopause (peri-menopause, menopause, and post-menopause) are all part of the body’s adjustment to these changes.

What are the symptoms of menopause?

  • Hot flashes. 
  • Vaginal dryness.
  • Frequent urination. 
  • Insomnia.
  • Emotional roller coaster (mood swings).
  • Dry skin, eyes, and mouth. 

What is premature menopause?

Menopause, when it occurs between the ages of 45 and 55, is considered "natural" and is a normal part of aging. But, some women can experience menopause early, either as a result of surgical intervention (such as removal of the ovaries), or damage to the ovaries (as from chemotherapy). Menopause that occurs before the age of 45, regardless of the cause, is called early menopause. Menopause that occurs at 40 or younger is considered premature menopause.

Some women who are in menopause transition may experience also peri-menopause: 

  • Breast tenderness.
  • Worsening pre-menstrual syndrome (PMS).
  • Irregular periods or skipping periods; some may be heavier or lighter.
  • Racing heart.
  • Headaches.
  • Joint and muscle aches and pains.
  • Changes in libido (sex drive).
  • Difficulty concentrating, memory lapses (often temporary).
  • Weight gain.
  • Hair loss or thinning. 

These are signs that less estrogen is being produced, In many instances, the changes in hormone levels are accompanied by mood swings (ups and downs).  Not all women get all of these symptoms; it varies from woman to woman.

Hot Flashes, how long will I have them?

Hot flashes are the most frequent symptoms of menopause. It is a brief sensation of heat. Hot flashes aren’t the same for everyone and there is no definitive reason that they happen. Aside from the heat, hot flashes can also come with:

  • Flushed face. 
  • Sweating.
  • A chill after sweating. 

Hot flashes are different for each person and last for various amounts of time. 

What triggers hot flashes?

  • Caffeine.
  • Smoking.
  • Spicy foods.
  • Alcohol.
  • Tight clothing.
  • Stress and anxiety.

Heat, including hot weather, can also trigger a hot flash. Be careful when working out in hot weather—this could cause a hot flash.

Does menopause cause facial hair growth?

Yes, increased facial hair growth can be a change related to menopause. The hormonal change your body goes through during menopause can result in several physical changes to your body, including more facial hair than you may have had in the past. If facial hair becomes a problem for you, waxing or using other hair removers may be options. Talk to your healthcare provider about your options to make sure you don’t pick a product that could harm your skin.

Dose concentration have anything to do with menopause?

Unfortunately, concentration and minor memory problems can be a normal part of menopause. Though this doesn’t happen to everyone, it can happen. Doctors aren’t sure why this happens. If you’re having memory problems during menopause, call your healthcare provider. There are several activities that have been shown to stimulate the brain and help rejuvenate your memory. These activities can include:

  • Doing puzzles, math problems, and reading. 
  • Cutting back on passive activities. 
  • Plenty of exercises.
  • Take heed that depression and anxiety can impact your memory.
  • The thyroid can cause problems, as well during menopause.

Any emotional changes during menopause?

  • A loss of energy and insomnia.
  • A lack of motivation and difficulty concentrating.
  • Anxiety, depression, mood changes, and tension.
  • Headaches.
  • Aggressiveness and irritability.

Managing all these symptoms throughout life can be difficult. Managing these symptoms during menopause is worse. Try taking a walk, yoga, running.  Take time with nature, hang out with friends that make you laugh, watch comedy (something that makes you laugh).  Lie down with your man or woman, give someone a hug, or get a pet (pets are known to lower blood pressure as well).  All these suggestions can help to restore balance and help relieve depression. 

What is Menopause?

it comes a time in your life where women stop having monthly periods, its a part of aging. it usually starts around lates the 40s to the early 50s. However, some women undergo ovaries surgery for varies reasons is also called “sudden” surgical menopause. 

Why does menopause happen? 

As you age, the reproductive cycle begins to slow down and prepares to stop. This cycle has been continuously functioning since puberty. As menopause nears, the ovaries make less of a hormone called estrogen. When this decrease occurs, your menstrual cycle (period) starts to change. It can become irregular and then stop. Physical changes can also happen as your body adapts to different levels of hormones. The symptoms you experience during each stage of menopause (perimenopause, menopause, and postmenopause) are all part of your body’s adjustment to these changes.

What are the symptoms of menopause?

  • Hot flashes. 
  • vaginal dryness.
  • Urinary frequently. 
  • Insomnia.
  • Emotional roller coaster (mood swings).
  • Dry skin, eyes, and mouth. 

What is premature menopause?

Menopause, when it occurs between the ages of 45 and 55, is considered "natural" and is a normal part of aging. But, some women can experience menopause early, either as a result of surgical intervention (such as removal of the ovaries) or damage to the ovaries (such as from chemotherapy). Menopause that occurs before the age of 45, regardless of the cause, is called early menopause. Menopause that occurs at 40 or younger is considered premature menopause.

Some women who are in menopause transition may experience also perimenopause: 

  • Breast tenderness.
  • Worsening PMS.
  • irregular periods or skipping periods some may be heavier or lighter.
  • Racing heart.
  • Headaches
  • Joint and muscle aches and pains.
  • Changes in libido (sex drive).
  • Difficulty concentrating, memory lapses (often temporary).
  • Weight gain.
  • Hair loss or thinning. 

This is a sign that estrogen is producing less as well as a sign of mood swings (ups and downs)  in hormone levels. Not All women get all these symptoms it varies from woman to woman.

Hot Flashes, how long will I have them?

Hot flashes are the most frequent symptoms of menopause. It is a brief sensation of heat. Hot flashes aren’t the same for everyone and there’s no definitive reason that they happen. Aside from the heat, hot flashes can also come with:

  • Flush face. 
  • Sweating.
  • A chill after sweating. 

Hot flashes are different for each person and the last various amounts of time. 

What triggers hot flashes?

  • Caffeine.
  • Smoking.
  • Spicy foods.
  • Alcohol.
  • Tight clothing.
  • Stress and anxiety.

Heat, including hot weather, can also trigger a hot flash. Be careful when working out in hot weather—this could cause a hot flash.

Does menopause cause facial hair growth?

Yes, increased facial hair growth can be a change related to menopause. The hormonal change your body goes through during menopause can result in several physical changes to your body, including more facial hair than you may have had in the past. If facial hair becomes a problem for you, waxing or using other hair removers may be options. Talk to your healthcare provider about your options to make sure you don’t pick a product that could harm your skin.

Dose concentrations have anything to do with menopause?

Unfortunately, concentration and minor memory problems can be a normal part of menopause. Though this doesn’t happen to everyone, it can happen. Doctors aren’t sure why this happens. If you’re having memory problems during menopause, call your healthcare provider. There are several activities that have been shown to stimulate the brain and help rejuvenate your memory. These activities can include:

  • Doing puzzles, math problems, and reading. 
  • Cutting back on passive activities. 
  • Plenty of exercises.
  • Take heed that depression and anxiety can impact your memory.
  • The thyroid can cause problems as well during menopause.

Any emotional changes during menopause?

  • A loss of energy and insomnia.
  • A lack of motivation and difficulty concentrating.
  • Anxiety, depression, mood changes, and tension.
  • Headaches.
  • Aggressiveness and irritability.

Managing all these symptoms throughout life can be difficult. managing these symptoms during menopause is worse. Try taking a walk, yoga, running, take time with nature, hang out with friends that make you laugh, watch comedy (something that make you laugh), Lay under your man, give someone a hug, or get a pet (pets are known to lower blood pressure as well) all these suggestions help lower depression. 

References:
https://my.clevelandclinic.org

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